baked brie

origin

A few Thanksgivings ago I was looking for a cheese appetizer and came across the baked brie concept. I checked a number of websites, and have no idea which sites I used to paste together this recipe. Since then it has become a staple appetizer for the family–deceptively easy, and always impresses. This is a hearty appetizer.

 

 

 

ingredients

-1 round of brie (not baby brie)

-1 puff pastry

-1 egg

-insides: match this to your meal. Two combinations I like: crasins with toasted almonds, and apricot jam with pecans.

-Box of crackers–I like the nuttiness of whole wheat crackers matched with the brie.

instructions

Preheat oven as per instructions on puff pastry box. Cut excess rind off the round of brie. (The rind on brie is edible, but sometimes it is extra thick in places.) Using a sharp knife, stand the wheel on its edge and cut the round in half. I find that using a French knife that has been run under cold tap water to be an easy way to do this. 

Lay the puff pastry out, and put one piece of the brie, rind side down, onto the center of the puff pastry. Put a thick layer of the ‘insides’ onto the brie (maybe a 1/2 inch), and then put the top on the brie. Fold the puff pastry around the brie. Cut off excess puff pastry as too many layers (this can easily happen on the top of the baked brie) makes it hard to bake it appropriately. Make sure that you fully seal the puff pastry by getting your finger tips wet. 

Line a small baking sheet with a piece of tin foil, and lightly spray the foil. Place the wrapped brie on the foil. Beat the egg, and then lightly coat the puff pastry with the egg using either a brush or your fingers. Bake the brie until the puff pastry is cooked–it should be golden brown. 

Let the baked brie set for about five minutes, and then serve with crackers. 


recipes

Today starts a beginning of ‘publishing’ my ‘recipes.’ I say ‘publishing’ because this is my website, so it is a form of publishing but remains a long way from traditional publishing which includes paper and ink. I say ‘recipes’ because, try as I might, nearly all of my recipes include general quantities, proportions, or concepts. I do not claim brilliance, but I love to share conversation over food and a bottle of wine, and am often trying something new. So this is for those of you who have asked me to share my recipes.